Love Letters to Valeska Gert by Eszter Salamon & Boglárka Börcsök (2016)

©Paco Rubio All rights reserved.

Love Letters to Valeska Gert Eszter Salamon’s work for Art–Music–Dance is an artistic correspondence with Jewish dancer Valeska Gert (nee Gertrud Valesca Samosch, 1982 Berlin, DE—1978 Kampen/Sylt, DE) and her works of the 1920s and 1930s. It is a physical and spiritual response from almost hundred years of distance from an artist to another artist. Here the voice becomes the vehicle for thoughts, feelings of friendship and love, for gratitude, joy and hope. It is a territory of experimentation, full of consciousness and desire to relate in order to re-invent a historicity and genealogy that canonical art history is incapable of. Valeska Gert was a figure of the avant-garde turning her back to modern dance already at the beginning of it’s rising. Gert has developed an experimental practice of performance by combining theater, dance, cinema, poetry and singing, a mixture of expression familiar to Berlin’s cabaret scene of that time.


Love Letters to Valeska Gert, a solo performance developed after Love Letters to Valeska Gert (2016), a sound installation by Eszter Salamon, presented for the first time at Museum der Moderne Salzburg in the frame of the group exhibition Art-Music-Dance. Both works were created and developed in collaboration with Boglárka Börcsök.

In empathy with Valeska Gert’s counter-hegemonic positioning and lifelong engagement in experimental performance practices, these letters not only celebrate artistic affinities but also stress the problematics of history making and the ‘power to narrate’. This choreography made of shifting perspectives between subjectivities and leaps between pasts and presents invites the visitors into a temporally and spatially unstable fiction where movement and voice become the extension of each other.


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©Paco Rubio All rights reserved.

performed in 20 Dancers for the XX Century by Musée de la Danse, Boris Charmatz at the Museo Reina Sofia in Madrid, Spain